UPCOMING FALL 2019 Inside-Out COURSE OFFERINGS

CAS 407 / Prisoner Narratives and Social Movements / Instructor katie dwyer

This course explores social change and conflict resolution through the lens of autobiography by incarcerated individuals whose stories and experiences influenced social movements and conflict situations. We will focus on three case studies: the struggle against Apartheid in South Africa, the Troubles in Northern Ireland, and the US during the Civil Rights era and today.

All interested students must complete an application and an interview with the instructor. Classes are held at the Oregon State Correctional Institution with an equal number of UO and incarcerated students. Students must agree to abide by the rules and policies of the Department of Corrections and the rules of Inside-Out and the UO's Prison Education Program. These rules will be discussed at length in a pre-class meeting. Holding classes in a prison offers unique opportunities for depth of discussion and diversity of experiences, and also is a complex emotional space.

Classes will be held on Wednesdays from 6-8:50pm (not including travel time) at Oregon State Correctional Institution. Applications must be emailed to kdwyer6@uoregon.edu and insideout@uoregon.edu.

CRES 410 / Restorative justice / Prof. nathaline frener

Join us for a critical and engaging discussion about the principles and practices of Restorative Justice. Through course dialogues and activities we will explore the needs and roles of victims, offenders, communities, and justice systems, as well as outline the principles and values of Restorative Justice. Assumptions about—and labels given to—all those involved will be examined.

Using the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program model, this course will include both “inside”(students inside OSP) and “outside” students (students at UO). This course will take place at the Oregon State Penitentiary in Salem.

This is a transformative learning experience that emphasizes collaboration and dialogue, while inviting students to address crime, justice, and other issues of social concern.

Classes will be held on an evening to be determined from 6-8:50pm (not including travel time) at Oregon State Penitentiary. Applications are due by 4pm on Wednesday, May 8 and must be delivered in print to the Conflict & Dispute Resolution Program, Suite 137, UO Law School

Interviews will be held on Wednesday, May 15. Email questions to nfrener@uoregon.edu.


CURRENT SPRING 2019 Inside-Out COURSE OFFERINGS

HC 421H / Religion, Ethics AND Literature: Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina / Prof. STEven Shankman

Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) is one of the greatest and most influential masters of the novel. The Russian literary classics of the nineteenth century, including the novels of Tolstoy, made a profound impression on Emmanuel Levinas (1906-1995), perhaps the greatest modern philosopher of the centrality of ethical obligation to what it means to be human. We will carefully read Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, paying special attention to what the novel has to say about ethics understood in Levinas’s sense: my inescapable responsibility for a unique and irreplaceable other. We will read Ethics and Infinity, a reasonably accessible and brief series of interviews with Levinas, and we will look for connections between Tolstoy’s fiction and Levinas’s thought. We will consider how Anna’s otherness is sacrificed, in Tolstoy’s novel, to a notion of religion that is divorced from ethics, a notion of religion that Emmanuel Levinas labels as “primitive”: “Everything that cannot be reduced to an interhuman relation,” Levinas writes in Totality and Infinity (79), "represents not the superior, but rather the forever primitive, form of religion.” Anna's husband Karenin’s dogmatic – and, perhaps paradoxically, at the same time “primitive” - understanding of Christianity makes it impossible for him to hear Anna’s voice, to see her face, to register her otherness, her alterity. Tolstoy’s critique of conventional religion as a silencing of lost voices is sounded again and again throughout the remainder of his career as a writer and thinker.  

This is an Inside-Out class: half the students (“inside” students) will be those who live inside OSCI and the other half (“outside” students) will be from UO’s main campus. 

Classes will be held on  Tuesday evenings from 6-8:50pm (not including travel time) at Oregon State Correctional Institute. Applications are due by 5pm on Friday, February 15 and must be emailed to the insideout@uoregon.edu and shankman@uoregon.edu .

An information session will be held at 4pm on Thursday, February 7 in Chapman Hall 101. Interviews will be held during Week 7 of Winter 2019.

HC 444H/431H / Geography and American Folk, From Angelou to Springsteen / Prof. SHAUL COHEN

How do we know who we are?  Identity is a story that we tell ourselves, and that is told to us, and about us, and is made up of many strands that continue to unfold in and around us.  In this course we will draw upon elements of popular and folk cultures to examine some of the stories that contribute to American identities.  Our materials will range from traditional sources such as “classic” literature to the immediacy of graffiti, and we will bring as many voices into conversation as we can.  

The course will be inside a prison, thus access to some types of media will be restricted, but our class will be far more diverse than a campus class in many ways.  This will give us an opportunity to consider issues such as authenticity, authority, inclusion, and exclusion, as we try to discern the processes and forces at work in the “construction” of the American sense of self (selves).  

In keeping with the pedagogy of Inside-Out, our time in the prison will be devoted primarily to dialogue and exploration, and we will draw upon academic readings and song, poetry, film and television, art, architecture, religion, politics, landscape, food, and on our accumulated impressions about this country and its many facets and communities.  Each participant in the course will be expected to draw upon their own experiences to inform our conversations.

This is an Inside-Out class: half the students (“inside” students) will be those who live inside OSCI and the other half (“outside” students) will be from UO’s main campus. 

Classes will be held on  Monday evenings from 6-8:50pm (not including travel time) at Oregon State Penitentiary. The class is an Honors College class, available to honor students. Applications are due by 5pm on Wednesday, February 20 and must be emailed to insideout@uoregon.edu and scohen@uoregon.edu .

An information session will be held at 6pm on Monday, February 11 in Condon Hall 206. Interviews will be held on Friday, February 22 from 2:00-5:00pm.


PAST COURSE OFFERINGS

WINTER 2019

PPPM 407 / Building Community with Fundraising and Grant Making: The Power of Philanthropy From Disenfranchised Communities / Prof. Kevin Alltucker

Join us for a critical exploration of the restorative characteristics of creating community through fundraising and grant making, from the perspectives of historically marginalized populations. While there has always been a strong thread of socially responsible philanthropy in the U.S., recent critics have urged more attention paid to equity and inclusion, and to the restorative qualities that result when marginalized populations conduct philanthropy themselves. This class is groundbreaking in that it combines several bodies of literature in a new way that will certainly be interesting, educationally challenging, and perhaps life- changing. 

Using the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program model, this course will include both student living inside OSCI ("inside" students), and students from the University of Oregon ("outside" students). This course will take place inside the OSCI in Salem. Inside and outside student will study alongside one another. 

This is a transformative learning experience that emphasizes collaboration and dialogue, and invites students to consider the differential effects of America's system of philanthropy, and how to create new forms of sustainable philanthropy.

Classes will be held on  Wednesday evenings from 6-8:30pm (not including travel time) at Oregon State Correctional Institute. Applications are due by 8pm, November 12 and must be emailed to the insideout@uoregon.edu and kalltuck@uoregon.edu .

Interviews will be held on Tues 11/13, 8:30-10p in the EMU 230 Swindells Room and Thurs (11/15) 7:30p – 9:30p in Peterson 107.

Fall 2018

CAS 407 / COMMUNICATION IN CONFLICT AND ACROSS CULTURES / INSTRUCTOR KATIE DWYER

This course will explore concepts in intercultural understanding as well as building skills in conflict resolution, cross-cultural work, coalition building, and individual self-reflection. We will examine both the broad frameworks for discussing cultural differences as well as thinking through the ways identity and context influence our experience of the world and our encounters with one another. Conflict resolution theories and skills will be a major focus. We will also discuss intercultural encounters in a variety of specific contexts, including education, the workplace, and in medical care. We will ground these concepts in our own experiences, and include real-world applications in our own lives.  To get to the Oregon State Correctional Institution in Salem we will leave campus at 4:00 in the afternoon, returning by 10:00.

Classes will be held on  Wednesday evenings from 6-8:30p (not including travel time) at Oregon State Correctional Institute. Applications are due by 5pm, August 28 and must be emailed to the insideout@uoregon.edu and kdwyer6@uoregon.edu .

FALL 2018

CRES / RESTORATIVE JUSTICE  / PROF. NATHALINE FRENER

Join us for a critical and engaging discussion about the principles and practices of Restorative Justice. Through course dialogues and activities we will explore the needs and roles of victims, offenders, communities, and justice systems, as well as outline the principles and values of Restorative Justice. Assumptions about—and labels given to—all those involved will be examined.

Using the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program model, this course will include both “inside”(students inside OSP) and “outside” students(students at UO). This course will take place at the Oregon State Penitentiary in Salem. This is a transformative learning experience that
emphasizes collaboration and dialogue, while inviting students to address crime, justice, and other issues of social concern.

Classes will be held  from 6-8:30p (not including travel time) at Oregon State Penitentiary. Date is TBD.  Applications are due by 5pm on Thursday, May 10 and must be delivered to the office of the Conflict & Dispute Resolution Program, Suite 137, at the UO Law School. Interviews will be held on Wednesday, May 23.

Spring 2018

GEOG 410 / NATIONALISM & ETHNICITY / PROF. SHAUL COHEN

The modern political system organizes the world into countries, and countries are often identified as belonging to nations.  Nationalism is an expression of belonging to a state, it roughly defines the land, people, and institutions that constitute the members of the state, according to that state. Ethnicity is an organizing mechanism that operates somewhat differently.  It too is an expression of belonging, and is composed of elements of culture, history, and identity that make its members distinct, but ethnicity is a cultural force that usually operates at a scale smaller than a state, and an ethnic group can exist in multiple states simultaneously, and within a state with other ethnic groups.  This course will address the powerful human constructs of nationalism and ethnicity, and examine the dynamics that mark societies that are made up of more than one ethnic group, as well as the increasingly rare parts of the world in which there are more monolithic societies.  It will focus on the tensions that individuals, families, communities, cultures, and countries experience when national and ethnicity are in tension.  Significant attention will be given to the experience(s) of the United States, and additional cases from around the world will be introduced.  Through readings, exercises, writing, and dialogue, students will learn about the some of the effects of nationalism and ethnicity in our own lives, and the lives of those around us. 

The course is based in the discipline of geography and will draw upon insights from psychology, sociology, anthropology, and other fields as well.  Class time is spent in dialogue and group exercises; there are no tests, but there is a writing assignment each week.  Half of the class members will be from campus, the other half from the prison.  The class will meet on Monday evenings, with mandatory attendance required through finals week. To get to the Oregon State Penitentiary in Salem we will leave campus at 4:00 in the afternoon, returning by 10:00.

Classes will be held on Monday evenings from 6-8:30p (not including travel time) at Oregon State Penitentiary. Applications are due by 5p on Monday, February 19 and can be submitted by email to insideout@uoregon.edu. Interviews will be held on Friday, February 23.